Worldwide operating IPv4 Broker and Internet Number Resources provider. Buy, sell, rent & lease out IPv4 and IPv6 addresses. LIR registration & management, AS/PI registration & support RIPE | ARIN | APNIC | LACNIC
 

APNIC – the RIR overview and main terms IP subnets owners should know

APNIC history

APNIC has been a crucial player in managing the distribution and registration of Internet number resources in the Asia-Pacific region since its inception in 1993. Over the years, the organization has evolved and expanded its reach by establishing National Internet Registries (NIRs) in the region.

The idea behind the NIRs was to promote greater local participation and improve service delivery by creating national or territorial organizations that could focus on meeting the specific needs of their communities while operating under the umbrella of APNIC.

The first NIR , the Japan Network Information Center (JPNIC) was established in Japan in 1997, and since then, several other NIRs have emerged in the region, including the Korean Network and Security Agency (KISA), the Taiwan Network Information Center (TWNIC), the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC), the Indonesian Internet Service Providers Association (APJII), The Indian Registry for Internet Names and Numbers (IRINN), The Vietnam Internet Network Information Center (VNNIC).

NIR’s:

  • The Korea Internet & Security Agency (KISA) NIR, formerly known as the Korea Network Information Center (KRNIC), was established in 1999 to manage Internet number resources in South Korea. KISA NIR has been instrumental in advancing Internet infrastructure and cybersecurity in the country, as well as promoting local participation in Internet governance and policy development.
  • The Taiwan Network Information Center (TWNIC) NIR was established in 1998 to manage Internet number resources in Taiwan. TWNIC has been actively involved in promoting the development of the Internet industry in Taiwan and has played a significant role in promoting local participation in Internet governance and policy development. Additionally, TWNIC has also been actively involved in promoting the adoption of IPv6 in Taiwan, contributing to the growth and development of the Internet in the country.
  • The Japan Network Information Center (JPNIC) is responsible for managing IP addresses, AS numbers, and other Internet number resources in Japan and has played a vital role in promoting the adoption of IPv6 in the country.
  • The China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) is responsible for managing Internet number resources in China, the world’s largest Internet market. CNNIC is not only responsible for the allocation of IP addresses and AS numbers but also plays a significant role in the development of Internet infrastructure in the country.
  • The Indonesian Internet Service Providers Association (APJII) NIR manages Internet number resources in Indonesia and has been actively involved in the development of the Internet in the country since its inception in 1996. APJII has also played a crucial role in advancing Internet governance and policy development in Indonesia.
  • The Indian Registry for Internet Names and Numbers (IRINN) NIR was established in 2012 to manage Internet number resources in India. The organization operates under the guidance of the National Internet Exchange of India (NIXI) and has been instrumental in the promotion of local participation and the development of the Internet industry in India.
  • The Vietnam Internet Network Information Center (VNNIC) NIR is responsible for managing Internet number resources in Vietnam. The organization has been actively involved in promoting the adoption of IPv6, contributing to the growth and development of the Internet in the country.

The formation of NIRs has had a significant impact on the development of the Internet in the Asia-Pacific region by decentralizing the management of Internet number resources, making them more accessible to local organizations. This has also encouraged greater collaboration among Internet stakeholders, fostering a sense of regional community and cooperation.

Overall, the establishment of NIRs has played a vital role in promoting local participation and regional cooperation, facilitating the development of a stable and secure Internet infrastructure in the Asia-Pacific region.

Main documents:

There’re a lot of different policies, but the key ones are:

  1. Standard APNIC Membership Agreement: This document outlines the terms and conditions that govern the registration and membership of organizations in APNIC. The agreement defines the rights and responsibilities of APNIC and its members, and covers topics such as membership fees, confidentiality, and dispute resolution.
  2. APNIC Internet Number Resource Policies: This policy governs the transfer of IPv4 and IPv6 address blocks , IPv4 and IPv6 allocation and utilization policies, ASN assignment and utilization policies. The policy outlines the requirements for transferring IPv4 addresses and AS numbers, including the need for a valid technical justification for the transfer. Also, this document establishes the policies and procedures for requesting IPv4 addresses from APNIC. It covers topics such as the allocation of IPv4 addresses to ISPs, criteria for IPv4 address requests, the requirements for assigning IP addresses or ASNs to organizations, including the need for a valid technical justification for the assignment.

Each of these documents plays a critical role in governing the allocation, transfer, and utilization of Internet number resources within the APNIC region. They are continually reviewed and updated by APNIC’s community to ensure that they remain relevant and effective in facilitating the growth and stability of the Internet in the region.

IPv4 Subnet types

There’re three IPv4 parent subnet types:

  1. Allocated Portable – IPv4 subnet allocated by APNIC to LIR
  2. Assigned Portable – IPv4 subnet allocated by APNIC to end user
  3. Historical – IPv4 subnet allocated by IANA to end user (IANA allocated IPv4 networks directly before RIRs were established)

And there’re two IPv4 assignment types available for IPv4 owners:

  1. Allocated Non-Portable – IPv4 subnet allocated by LIR to their customers for further assignment by those customers.
  2. Assigned Non-Portable – IPv4 subnet assigned by LIR to their customers for specific use within the Internet infrastructure they operate. Such assignments cannot be sub-assigned

IPv4 transfer terms

Main IPv4 transfer terms and restrictions are:

  • An IPv4 subnet delegated from the 103/8 free pool cannot be transferred the next 5 years after it’s original allocation.
  • The minimum transfer size is a /24.
  • Recipients registered in APNIC that do not have IPv4 resources must demonstrate a detailed plan for the use of the transferred resource within 24 months
  • Recipients registered in APNIC that already hold IPv4 resources must demonstrate a detailed plan for the use of the transferred resource within 24 months, show past usage rate, and provide evidence of compliance with APNIC policies with respect to past delegations
  • Recipients registered in APNIC can request a transfer pre-approval to ensure they comply with the APNIC policies to obtain new subnets. Pre-approvals are valid for 24 months from the approval date.
  • Both parties shall provide a valid company registration document which shows the person authorized to act on behalf of the company.
  • The IPv4 subnet recipient registered in APNIC must pay a transfer fee. The IPv4 transfer fee does not apply to initial IPv4 transfers to Member accounts holding no IP addresses.
  • For inter-RIR transfers, a party registered in APNIC must pay a transfer fee. The IPv4 transfer fee does not apply to initial IPv4 transfers to Member accounts holding no IP addresses.

LIR registration overview

In order to become an APNIC member, you must have a company established and operating in APNIC service region. You can also apply as a natural person if you confirm your presence in APNIC service region. If you don’t legally present in APNIC service region, you must have networks located in the APNIC region

Documents and information required for LIR registration in APNIC:

  • Organization details (company code, VAT, addresses, phone numbers, email);
  • Signatory details;
  • Certificate of incorporation with translation into English;
  • Abuse mail
  • Corporate/technical/financial representative details for the account: Full name, position, phone, email – can be one entry for all three roles.
  • Backup contact if the corporate representative is unavailable: Full name, position, phone, email
  • Organization’s area of activity
  • Website
  • Power of attorney for our employee to apply
  • Recent bank statement or utility bills (water, electricity) issued in the name of the organization.

This is sufficient to become a member of APNIC without resources.

However, if you also plan to request IP addresses from APNIC, you will need to provide additional supporting documents justifying the need for internet numbering resources and their intended use in the APNIC zone:

  1. Date of network deployment
  2. Equipment description and documents (the more the better):
  • Copies of invoices or receipts for equipment needed for deployment;
  • Contract with service provider showing that you have the ability to use the network on the internet
  • IXP agreement (if you are IXP)
  • ISP/telecom license
  • Any other documents confirming the need for addresses
  1. Network topology diagram

APNIC charges the following fees for registration and membership:

  1. If membership without requesting resources: 500 AUD sign-up fee; 500 AUD annual membership fee
  2. If membership with request for resources (/24 IPv4; /48 IPv6): 500 AUD sign-up fee; 1180 AUD annual membership fee
  3. If membership with request for /23 IPv4, the annual membership fee ranges from 1546 to 2025 AUD, depending on the desired size of the IPv6 block (/32 or /48)

AS registration is additionally paid 500 AUD.

Questions? Contact us via email: info@voldeta.com

Follow us to get the latest articles and news:

GermanRussiaFrenchLithuaniaEnglish